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Heritage Foundation, ein kriminelles Enterprise von : Zalmay Khalilzad, William Barr, Richard Grenell bis Edwin Meese

Januar 25, 2022 1 Kommentar

Zalmay Khalilzad Zalmay Khalilzad, the Trump administration’s special representative to the Afghan peace process, brokered a so-called peace deal with… Richard Grenell Richard Grenell, a Republican operative known for his polarizing views and controversial work for foreign governments, is an outspoken Trump… William Barr Donald Trump’s second attorney general, William Barr has been an extreme Trump loyalist, going to extraordinary lengths to shield…

Edwin Meese

Edwin Meese III (* 2. Dezember 1931 in Oakland, Kalifornien) ist ein US-amerikanischer Politiker (Republikanische Partei). Er war unter Ronald Reagan von 1985 bis 1988 der 75. Justizminister der Vereinigten Staaten.

From the Wires

What ails Libya’s peace process? March 02, 2020 READ The Paradox of America’s Endless Wars February 26, 2020 READ Neocons in the Age of Trump? The Case of the FDD and Iran’s “Fake Opposition” February 19, 2020 READ The American Chaos Machine: U.S. Foreign Policy Goes Off the Rails January 25, 2020 READ

Heritage Foundation

last updated: May 3, 2017

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Contact Information
Heritage Foundation214 Massachusetts Ave, NE
Washington DC, 20002-4999
Phone: 202-546-4400
Fax: 202-546-8328
Email: info@heritage.org
Website: www.heritage.org
Founded
1973
Mission
The mission of The Heritage Foundation is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense.  
Selected Principals (as of 2017)
Thomas Saunders, chairman
Midge Decter, emeritus trustee
Edwin Feulner, trustee
Steve Forbes, trustee

The Heritage Foundation is a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that has been a mainstay of right-wing domestic and foreign policy advocacy since 1973, when Paul Weyrich and Edwin Feulner founded it with the help of Joseph Coors, the heir to the Coors beer empire.[1]

As of 2017, the organization’s leadership included Thomas Saunders, former managing director of Morgan Stanley, as chairman; Barb Van Andel-Gaby, former vice present of Amway Hotel Corporation, as vice chairman; and former presidential candidate Steve Forbes as trustee. Former Sen. Jim DeMint (R-SC), who took over as its president in 2013, abruptly resigned in May 2017 after what the Board of Trustees, in a statement, described as “significant and worsening management issues that led to a breakdown of internal communications and cooperation.” Former Dick Cheney adviser David Addington served as Heritage’s vice president until 2016.Heritage Foundation

The foundation took a leading role in the conservative movement during Ronald Reagan’s presidency, when its Mandate for Leadership study helped shape many of the administration’s policies.[2] Heritage sometimes appears to be less ideologically committed on some foreign policy issues than neoconservative groups like the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) or the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD). Nevertheless, it has consistently advocated for an expansive “war on terror,” controversial weapons programs like missile defense, massive defense budgets, and militaristic approaches to dealing with U.S adversaries.

Heritage maintains a large number of in-house experts and fellows who, supported by hundreds of staff and management personnel, cover a wide range of conservative issues.[3] According to the National Review, “Today, it’s hard to identify a corner of economic or foreign policy that the Heritage Foundation has not touched, from abstinence education to sanctions on North Korea to zero-based budgeting.”[4]

In addition to its policy work, Heritage has an associated political action arm called Heritage Action for America. Growing policy differences between Heritage Action and DeMint, including over healthcare reform, reportedly were an important source of contention that helped lead to DeMint’s departure from the think tank.

Although it opposed Donald Trump during the 2016 Republican presidential primary, since Trump’s election Heritage has served as an important source of policy advice for the new administration. The New Republic opined that “the Heritage-Trump alliance” was one of the “more improbable developments” of the 2017 election, representing “a return to prominence for the conservative think tank.” Politico reported that Heritage employees served as a “shadow transition team.”

Led by Heritage foreign policy pundit James Jay Carafano, Heritage came out in support of Trump’s early moves on foreign policy. In an April 2017 article, in which Carafano boasted about his “briefings” to Trump and his team,  the Heritage writer argued that “What distinguishes Trump—and what marks a particularly sharp departure from Obama—is his perception of what enabled post–World War America and the rest of the free world to rise above the chaos of a half century of global depression and open war.. …  America will never be safe in the world if the world doesn’t have an America that is free, safe and prosperous. That belief is at the heart of Trump’s policies designed to spark an economic revival, rollback the administrative state and rebuild the military. It lies at the core of his mantra: make America great again.”

Regarding Middle East policy, Carafano wrote: “The bomb strike on Syria was not a prelude to regime change or nation-building in Syria. It was a warning shot to Assad to cut it out and stop interfering in U.S. efforts to finish off ISIS, stabilize refugee populations and keep Iraq from falling apart. Engagement with Egypt was to signal America is back working with partners to stabilize the region and counter the twin threats of Islamist extremism and Iran. Neither is a kick-ass-and-withdraw operation. These are signs of long, serious engagement, shrinking the space in which bad actors can operate.”

Approach and Evolution

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Bush Administration

Although Heritage took a smaller role than AEI in the George W. Bush administration—which employed some two-dozen AEI scholars—Heritage nevertheless served as an important bastion of support for the Bush administration’s conservative agenda, including on foreign and defense issues.

A key example was the Heritage Homeland Defense Project, an initiative it started a few days after 9/11 and whose report, Defending the American Homeland, was published in January 2002. Although some of the study’s recommendations included widely supported ideas such as a proposal to improve U.S. readiness for a potential bioterror attack, the report also used 9/11 to push for defense programs that would have little or no impact on preventing the sort of attacks perpetrated in New York and Washington, like deploying a national missile defense system. Missile defense had been a key item on the agenda of many Bush administration figures, including Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. Participants in the study, which was chaired by L. Paul Bremer and Edwin Meese, included Pete Wilson, Daniel Goure, and Fred Ikle.[30]

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Bush Administration

Although Heritage took a smaller role than AEI in the George W. Bush administration—which employed some two-dozen AEI scholars—Heritage nevertheless served as an important bastion of support for the Bush administration’s conservative agenda, including on foreign and defense issues.

A key example was the Heritage Homeland Defense Project, an initiative it started a few days after 9/11 and whose report, Defending the American Homeland, was published in January 2002. Although some of the study’s recommendations included widely supported ideas such as a proposal to improve U.S. readiness for a potential bioterror attack, the report also used 9/11 to push for defense programs that would have little or no impact on preventing the sort of attacks perpetrated in New York and Washington, like deploying a national missile defense system. Missile defense had been a key item on the agenda of many Bush administration figures, including Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. Participants in the study, which was chaired by L. Paul Bremer and Edwin Meese, included Pete Wilson, Daniel Goure, and Fred Ikle.[30]